JAM with Chrome: Online Realtime Music Making

JAM with Chrome is a collaborative live music experience in your browser, that makes use of several web technologies and Google products, to allow you and up to three of your friends to jam together in real time.

We’ve combined these technologies to bring you the complete JAM with Chrome experience. When you play the instruments, your browser will tell other users browsers which notes to play, how to play them, and how to animate the user interface.” ~ developer’s note

 

imgresThere are countless, pointless, feckless, virtual musical instruments on the web. Here at Music Toolbox we have spent many a fruitless hour searching for an online piano that didn’t (for the privilege of struggling with a bad interface and subpar samples), bombard us with inappropriate pop-up ads. JAM with Chrome is different. Exceptional care has gone into every aspect of JWC, from its user friendly interface, to the visually stunning instruments and well recorded samples. It is not however just a collections of well-crafted online instruments. Making use of the newest innovations in HTML5, Canvas, CSS3, Web Audio API, and more, the good people at GoogleDinahMoe (audio) and Tools of North America have created a masterpiece of collaborative musical expression…and it’s free.

 

[title size=”2″]Developer’s Intro[/title]

 

[title size=”2″]JAM with Chrome Demo (Part 1)[/title]

 

[title size=”2″]JAM with Chrome Demo (Part 2)[/title]

 


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[title size=”2″]Ease of Use[/title]
JWC is very easy to use and share with others. The “pro”version of each instrument is a little more difficult to get used to, but JWC’s computer keyboard layouts are very intuitive.

[title size=”2″]Mobile Compatibility [/title]
JWC currently only works on your laptop or desktop, and only seems to work with the Chrome browser. 🙂

[/one_half]

[one_half last=”yes”]

[title size=”2″]Web Sharing[/title]
It is not really possible to embed JWC inside your LMS, but you can easily share links with your students and friends.

[title size=”2″]Pricing and Accounts[/title]
It’s free and very well developed. Additionally, a lot of supporting materials are provided for people wishing to pursuing these technologies further.

[/one_half]

[separator top=”10″ bottom=”10″]

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[accordian][toggle title=”Pros:”]

  • Free
  • Attractive and functional interface
  • Multiple instruments (19 in total)
  • 2 ways to play each instrument (easy and pro mode)
  • Perform online with up to 3 friends (JAM handles the syncing of audio)
  • Text chat between performers
  • Very high quality samples
  • Support for multiple musical genres and styles
  • Ability to switch keys and adjust tempos

[/toggle][/accordian]
[/one_half]

[one_half last=”yes”]
[accordian][toggle title=”Cons:”]

  • No audio chat
  • Limited chord selections, without changing keys
  • The auto patterns can be a bit “heavy/active” for some of the instruments.
  • All of instruments are set at the same volume, so when playing in a group there is no way to mix one of the instruments down.
  • No gradated dynamics
  • The pro mode guitar only lets you pick pitches on the top four strings (understandable).
  • Shaky internet can cause lag, especially in pro mode
  • No built in way to record your sessions (Use Audio Hijack)
  • No mobile support. JAM with Chrome is begging for a good mobile implementation.

[/toggle][/accordian]

[/one_half]

 

By | 2014-05-12T09:37:44+00:00 May 11th, 2014|

About the Author:

Composer, Music Educator and Instructional Designer, Stephen Wilcox received a B.M. in instrumental performance (tuba) and a B.M. in music theory from West Chester University, a M.M. in Composition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as a Ph.D. in Composition at the University of Pennsylvania. Most recently, he has been creating online music theory courses for Rutgers University and working as an instructional designer at UC Berkeley.

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Stephen Wilcox

Stephen Wilcox

Stephen Wilcox received a B.M. in instrumental performance (tuba) and a B.M. in music theory from West Chester University, a M.M. in Composition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as a Ph.D. in Composition at the University of Pennsylvania. Most recently, he has been creating online music theory courses for Rutgers University and working as an instructional designer at UC Berkeley.

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