Thursday Quick Tip – Set Starting Time for a YouTube Video

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Have you ever told your students to start listening to a YouTube video at a specific time (“start listening at minute 16…”)? Learn to set a start and end time for your embedded YouTube clips.

 

[title size=”2″]YouTube Link[/title] In the demo above, I created a weblink that started my chosen clip at a specific time.

Here is the link:

http://youtu.be/C6yIgN54R7k?t=2m38s

The end of this code, “?t=2m38s” sets a time for the start of the clip (time = 2 minutes and 38 seconds).

 

[title size=”2″]YouTube Embed Codes[/title] In testing this I discovered that things have changed a little bit. It is no longer possible to directly get this type of “stop/start” time code on an embedded clip.

Here is the embed code YouTube provided for this same video, but without timings.

<iframe width=”480″ height=”360″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/C6yIgN54R7k” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

That being said, it is still possible to alter this embed code to allow for specific start and stop times.

<iframe width=”480″ height=”360″ src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/C6yIgN54R7k?start=158&end=170” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

This is almost identical, but the follow little tag is added.

?start=158&end=170

The start time is set to the 158th second (60sec x2 + 38sec = 2min & 38sec), and the end time is set to the 170th second (60sec x2 + 50sec = 2min & 50sec).

Adding this code directly after the URL in your embed code will produce the same effect.

?start=XXX&end=XXX

Replace the “XXX” with the desired number of seconds.

By | 2014-05-10T01:08:12+00:00 May 1st, 2014|

About the Author:

Composer, Music Educator and Instructional Designer, Stephen Wilcox received a B.M. in instrumental performance (tuba) and a B.M. in music theory from West Chester University, a M.M. in Composition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as a Ph.D. in Composition at the University of Pennsylvania. Most recently, he has been creating online music theory courses for Rutgers University and working as an instructional designer at UC Berkeley.

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Stephen Wilcox

Stephen Wilcox

Stephen Wilcox received a B.M. in instrumental performance (tuba) and a B.M. in music theory from West Chester University, a M.M. in Composition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as a Ph.D. in Composition at the University of Pennsylvania. Most recently, he has been creating online music theory courses for Rutgers University and working as an instructional designer at UC Berkeley.

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